Brian Maule at le Chardon D’or removes fioe gras from menu

23rd August 2019 (Last Updated August 23rd, 2019 12:10)

Fine-dining restaurant Brian Maule at le Chardon D’or has joined the list of Scottish restaruants that have removed foie gras off its menu.

Brian Maule at le Chardon D’or removes fioe gras from menu
A menu item featuring Foie gras “en cocotte” with mustard seeds and spring onions in duck juice. Credit: Charles Haynes.

Fine-dining restaurant Brian Maule at le Chardon D’or has joined the list of Scottish restaurants that have removed foie gras from its menu.

Brian Maule also confirmed this move to a supporter of Open Cages. It is in response to a campaign from animal protection organisation, Open Cages.

The non-profit organisation, through a dialogue with the restaurant, conveyed practices needed to produce foie gras.

Foie Gras is food product made from the fattened liver of a duck or goose. Farms force feed the birds using metal pipes to pump as much food as possible in order to make its liver to swell up to ten times their normal size.

In April this year, foie gras caused public outcry after footage of a Ukrainian farm was released showing the practices used to make the product.

Following this some of the major Scottish restaurants such as Number One, and The Witchery by the Castle and Dine, announced their commitment to remove foie gras from their menu.

Recently, Ukraine announced that the country’s last foie gras farm is expected to close next month.

The Witchery owner James Thomson OBE said: “I would strongly encourage any restaurateur or chef who is serving foie gras to read about the Foie Gras Farms in Ukraine and across Europe and to remove it from their menu.

“We are a nation of animal lovers and must stop eating Foie Gras to end this horrendous torture once and for all.”

Open Cages is currently calling on other restaurants in the country to keep the product off their menu.