McDonald’s franchisee Stanton Enterprise in North Carolina has paid $5,517 in civil penalty over violation of the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) child labour laws.

The US Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division (WHD) investigated an incident involving a 15-year-old employee, who suffered a burn to her arm while working at the franchisee’s McDonald’s location in Mount Holly.

WHD’s investigation determined that the company had exposed a minor to a hazardous occupation by allowing her to operate an electric deep fryer without an automatic function.

The investigation also identified that the franchisee allowed minors to work outside of the legal hours.

Wage and Hour Division district director Richard Blaylock said: “Child labour laws exist to strike a balance between providing meaningful work experience for young people and keeping them safe on the job.

“Incidents like this one should serve to remind employers of the importance of not permitting employees under the age of 18 to participate in prohibited work.”

“Incidents like this one should serve to remind employers of the importance of not permitting employees under the age of 18 to participate in prohibited work.

“We encourage all employers to review their obligations and to contact the Wage and Hour Division for compliance assistance.”

In addition, WHD noted that the company failed to display legally required postings for the Employee Polygraph Protection Act and the Family & Medical Leave Act.

According to WHD, the FLSA law restricts employees of 14 and 15 years to work for around three hours on a school day, as well as 18 hours in a school week.

In addition, the employees can work around eight hours during a non-school day and 40 hours in a non-school week.